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20131028
20131105
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Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
ferrari has our story. >> a bipartisan group of lawmakers, curtail the national security agency's indistric indiscriminate,. >> james sensenbrenner. , provides stronger restrictions against who the nsa can target when it comes to spying and require the government to delete information it collects accidentally, more aggressively than it does now. the bill reportedly has a dozen co-sponsors in the senate and 70 in the house. meanwhile senator dianne feinstein, the democratic head of the intelligence committee, in a statement feinstein said i am totally opposed to nsa surveillance of u.s. allies. it is abundantly clear that a total review of all intelligence programs is necessary. the white house says that president obama was not aware of just how extensive the nsa's intelligence gathering was until this summer but the president insists there will be a complete review of the nsa's spying policy. >> what we've seen over the last several years is their capacity has continued to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating a review to make sure that what they're able to do doesn't
the nation's top spy chief. the head of the national security agency denied reports of phone tapping of foreign citizens and told house members the nsa would rather take a beating in the media than give up a program that protects americans from terrorists. >> the national security agency says chiefs did not illegally tapped. they revealed rare details of america's intelligence gathering techniques. >> confident and almost defiant top spy chiefs made no apologies before the house intelligence committee. they defended the job the agencies do to keep america and her allies safe. >> there's not been a mass casualty in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forgive this. they continued to try. >> the work of the national security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst, edward snowden. documents he leaked showed phone calls of millions of ordinary citizens. testimony of keith alexander and others told the committee the content is secret in a lock box unless there is a link to terrorism. th
" says the u.s. national security agency and the central intelligence agency used a joint program called the special collections service. the magazine report says agents installed about 80 high-performance antennas to capture records of mobile phone, online, and satellite communications. the article mentions 80 locations. 19 of them are in europe. the targets were allegedly classified into a five-scale list that was reviewed every 18 months by the staff of the white house and the secret services. >>> international experts overseeing chemical weapons in syria may have missed a deadline. the inspectors arrived at the beginning of the month. they had been checking 23 facilities used to store chemical agents. they've been negotiating to get into those facilities. officials with the organization for the prohibition of chemical weapons haven't said how the inspectors did it on sunday or whether they met their goal. the syrian government has met one of their deadlines. and they plan to destroy the arsenal. experts will spend the next few weeks drawing up their own plans. they hope to dispose of
, deputy attorney general james cole, national security agency director, keith alexander, deputy director of the nsa, chris england. following the first panel, moving immediately into the second panel of nongovernment experts who are very knowledgeable on fisa and privacy issues. today's hearing is an open forum to discuss potential amendments to the foreign intelligence surveillance act and possible changes to the way fisa applications are handled by the department of justice and the nsa. i hope that all of our witnesses will give clear answers about how proposals under consideration in congress would affect the nsa's ability to stop terrorist attacks before they occur. i encourage members to ask questions about fisa amendments and nsa programs, but today i'm going to submit my statement for the record in order to ask some questions following opening statements in relation to some of the news of the day when you get things clarified for the record which is important for the american people. we go about our business and expect a vote. we'll hold as long as we can, take a brief intermissio
security agency is on the defensive on multiple fronts. the nsa surveillance practices at home and abroad have been front page news afte after the s from nsa contractor edward snowdon. now, bills are in the works in the house and senate that would rein in the spy masters. tonight on inside story we'll take a closer look at the nsa since 9/11, including its mission, it's practices, and it's future. but first this background. >> director keith alexander. >> reporter: demand for intelligence gathering reform are growing on capitol hill over the wake of revelations of massive information gathering. there has been crafted buy partisan legislation to end the collection of puck phone records and the government only focus on foreigners who pose threats. 12 years later the continuing disclosures of nsa surveillance has pushed them to try to rein in the broad sweep of intelligence gathering. appearing on pbs last night. >> there has to be a balance between privacy and security. the nsa and their supporters in the congress have said let's forget about privacy. let's forget about civil liberties. i c
government stops watching us. >> former national security agency whistleblower, strake speaking saturday at the stop watching us rally. he was charged with espionage after he was suspected of revealing information about the agency's warrantless wiretapping program. original charges against him were dropped. former republican governor of new mexico gary johnson also addressed the crowd. >> the government has granted itself power that it does not have. [applause] we have to stand against this. forla merkel, thank you bringing attention to the world that the u.s. is monitoring the .ell phones of 35 world leaders thank you for allowing us to recognize that 70 million cell phone conversations in france every month are being monitored. edward snowden, thank you -- [applause] thank you for bringing to the attention of the world the fact the u.s. government, the nsa is engaged in massive information gathering. 125 billion cell phone conversations a month. judge's granting legal authority 113the nsa to monitor million verizon users. this is not due process. >> former republican governor of new me
and the national security agency pushed back. >> one of the first things i learned in intel school in 1963 is that this is the fundamental giveen in the intelligence. >> woodruff: that fundamental according to director of national intelligence james clapper, is learning the intentions of foreign leaders, even if it means spying on allies. what's more, he told today's house hearing it's a two-way street. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america, our intelligence services, our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there have been disclosures in recent days that the national security agency eavesdroped on german chancellor angela merkel. the n.s.a.'s director, army general keith al sander the, defended the general practice of surveillance in the u.s. and abroad to prevent terrorist attacks. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck! they didn't stop hating us. they didn't say that they were going to just forgive this. they continue to try. it is the great me
of national intelligence and general keith alexander, the head of the national security agency, the nsa, will be testifying answering questions, presumably about the nsa surveilance program including reports over the past few days that the u.s. has been spying on allied leaders, including monitoring the personal cell phone of the german chancellor angela merkel. we'll monitor what's going on, bring you the highlights. stand by for that. right now he's just opening up the hearing. meanwhile, president obama is being hammered on many fronts right now. how much did he know about the surveilance of friendly allies? why didn't he know about the problems that were going to plague the health care website? i want you to listen to part of the new article from cnn's chief political analyst gloria borger she just wrote and posted on cnn.com. i'll read you a line. the ultimate irony may be this. a president who extols the virtues of government has now been sucked into the big government vortex experiencing up close and personal as they say what it feels like to lose control to the bureaucrats. the
the show. the country's leadership seems to be on clear what its national security agency is doing as we report later. the syrian government dismantled its chemical production facilities but the disarmament process pain in the balance of some rebel groups continued to defy the deal. watts. water teach science. as of the really bad about here the fourth test on the nose wheel over it the smiles that the us military officers mask the pain full force feeding of detainees at guantanamo bay. archie reports from behind a barbed wire. a new new. watching the weekly it's not a cure mrt with me in east now it's good to have you with us that the latest news plus a look back at the week's top stories putting a human face to america's so called war on terror in pakistan on family and a drone strike victims testified in front of congress this week. having lost their grandmother in what was reported as a precision strike on militants yes lawmakers want the us targeted their home counties each cheek and without the emotional briefing. this was the first time actual victims of us drone strikes word in c
forgive this. they continued to try. >> the work of the national security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the nsa has been collecting phone calls and text mess inls of millions of citizens. congressman james sensesenbrenner, the author of the "the patriot act" is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, stopping dragnet collection of phone calls from citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is tarted and appoint an advocate to the courts protecting rights. the director of national intelligence, james clapper, and national security director keith alexander told the committee the content of phone calls was secret in a lock box, unless there is a link to terrorism. and that, they say, is rare. >> there would only be looked at if we had reasonable and artic u la ble suspicious that we had connection to a foreign, al qaeda-related group, and look into the box. in 2012 we had 2088 such selectors, that we could look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the committee hearing t
security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst, edwin snowden. s scongressman james sense en brenner is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, which would stop dragnet collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and .a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights but director of national intelligence james clapper and general keith alexander told the schmidt the content of phone calls remain secret in a virtual lockbox unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that, they say, is rare. >> there wiat would only be loo when we had reasonable and articulable suspicious that we had connection to a foreign al-qaeda or related terrorist group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 88 such selectors that we could go and look into that. >> that's it. of the billions of records, only 28 yeah. >> at the committee hearing, there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. had spied on america's allies but at the whitehouse, it was still a hot topic. press secre
problems. when we found mistakes we reported, addressed and corrected them. the national security agency specifically is part of the intelligence community broadly is an honorable institution. the men and women who do this work are honorable people dedicated to conducting their mission lawfully and appalled by any wrongdoing. they, too, are citizens of this nation who care just as much about privacy and constitutional rights as the rest of us. they should be commended for their crucial important work in protecting the people of the country, which has been made all the more difficult by this torrent of unauthorized damaging disclosures. that all said, we in the ic stand ready to work in partnership with you to just surveillance authorities to further protect our privacy and civil liberties. i think there's some principles we already agree on. first we must protect sources, methods, targets, partners, sources, liaisons and relationships. we must do a better job helping american people understand what we do, why we do it and rigorous oversight that helps ensure we do it correctly. third we
is thecn best-kept secret left in washington d.c. b the national security agency could learn something from secretary sebelius. unanimous consent -- later today -- to approve a six-page require thein administration to answer these questions every week. secretary sebelius is not responsible for enactingut obamacare, but she has been responsible for three and ars one-half years for implementing it. now many americans have only a few weeks to purchase new insurance or be without health insurance. to expect the secretary to correct in a few weeks what she's not been able to do in three and one-half years is unrealistic. mr. president, it's time for the president to ask the secretary of health and human services toc resign. r i thankes the president, and i yield the floor. be. >> today's white house briefing expected to get under way in just a moment. we will have it live here on c-span2 when it starts. earlier during general speeches in the senate we heard a series of senators talking about the one-year anniversary of hurricane sandy hitting the east coast of the u.s. and recovery efforts. hurr
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)